All About Landscape Daily News

DESIGN, PLANTATION, AND MAINTENANCE OF DISH GARDENS

Nov 14

Have you tried creating a dish garden? Think of a dish garden as a tiny landscape in a small pot if you're unsure what it is or how to create one. Usually, it grows from the inside rather than the exterior. I hadn't made one in a while and was motivated by some peperomias I had just purchased. Everything you need to know about planting and caring for your plants is covered in this lesson on dish gardening.

 

DISH GARDEN CAN BE MADE IN 2 WAYS

I illustrate these two techniques in the video down below. The vegetation in 1 is still in its grow containers. The plants in the dish garden in the first image are placed in soil right away. The majority of dish gardens are made in the same way, which is how I like to make them. For a very long time, the turquoise ceramic piece will be on display in my dining room.

There are a few benefits to keeping the plants in the grow pots, including their lighter weight, the lack of soil requirements, their ease of replacement as individual plants, the lack of a drain hole in the container you're using, and your desire to remove the plants so you can plant them separately. Additionally, if you're doing a one-time planting, this is more practical.

Permanent vs. Temporary

For an event, as a gift, or for a particular occasion like Christmas, Thanksgiving, or Easter, a temporary planting is one that is made. You are free to use any assortment of plants since this arrangement is just temporary.

Choose plants that will grow well together since a permanent planting will endure for a long time. The other dish garden is a mix of Peperomias, while one of the dish gardens is a cactus garden.

Fashion / Design

You are free to choose a design or style. Popular choices include the desert, fairy, vintage, Japanese, tropical, sleek & modern, and festive holiday.

They are appropriate for many different situations, including centerpieces for weddings.

Various Container Options

Along with your choice of plants and ornaments, here is where you can express your creativity. Dish garden containers, which are often shallow, may be replaced with baskets, earthenware, and terra cotta. Glass, metal, and resin (or plastic) are also often used.

You may find strange containers in your attic, at garage sales, and flea markets. I used my father's old dump truck from his youth to create this amusing dish garden, which you can see here.

Certain containers may or may not have drain holes. Dish gardens need drainage, so be careful to use the stones and charcoal in the manner suggested below.

Plant Choices

I like using plants with a variety of heights, textures, forms, and colors. Having said that, I like a dish garden made up just of low plants, such as a cactus or mushy succulent. Everything that is eye-catching is necessary.

A word of caution: make sure the plants you're combining have comparable exposure and watering requirements. I wouldn't, for instance, combine pothos and peace lilies with cactus (high light, low water) (lower light, more water).

Give the plants room to expand. In addition to being introduced for color, the yellow kalanchoe also filled in the space in front of the peperomias as they matured.

 

DESIGN, PLANTATION, AND MAINTENANCE OF DISH GARDENS

A woman holding a dish garden in a turquoise-glazed ceramic pot is wearing a blue shirt and pink blouse.
Have you tried creating a dish garden? Think of a dish garden as a tiny landscape in a small pot if you're unsure what it is or how to create one. Usually, it grows from the inside rather than the exterior. I hadn't made one in a while and was motivated by some peperomias I had just purchased. Everything you need to know about planting and caring for your plants is covered in dish gardening 101.

 

DISH GARDEN CAN BE MADE IN 2 WAYS

I illustrate these two techniques in the video down below. The vegetation in 1 is still in its grow containers. The plants in the dish garden in the first image are placed in soil right away. The majority of dish gardens are made in the same way, which is how I like to make them. For a very long time, the turquoise ceramic piece will be on display in my dining room.


There are a few benefits to keeping the plants in the grow pots, including their lighter weight, the lack of soil requirements, their ease of replacement as individual plants, the lack of a drain hole in the container you're using, and your desire to remove the plants so you can plant them separately. Additionally, if you're doing a one-time planting, this is more practical.

On a work table outside a garage, there are two dish gardens and a turquoise pot with glaze on it.

On my dependable old work table, there are two dish gardens already constructed and a ceramic bowl waiting to be planted.


Here are some of our general houseplant guides for your reference:

  • How to Water Indoor Plants Step by Step
  • Plant Repotting: A Beginner's Guide
  • Three Effective Methods for Fertilizing Indoor Plants
  • How to Increase Plant Humidity For Houseplants: How to Maintain Clean Plants (Winter Houseplant Care Guide)
  • Purchasing Houseplants: 14 Indoor Gardening Beginner Tips
  • 11 Plants That Are Pet-Friendly for the Home

Permanent vs. Temporary

For an event, as a gift, or for a particular occasion like Christmas, Thanksgiving, or Easter, a temporary planting is one that is made. You are free to use any assortment of plants since this arrangement is just temporary.


Choose plants that will grow well together since a permanent planting will endure for a long time. The other dish garden is a mix of Peperomias, while one of the dish gardens is a cactus garden.

Fashion / Design

You are free to choose a design or style. Popular choices include the desert, fairy, vintage, Japanese, tropical, sleek & modern, and festive holiday.

They are appropriate for many different situations, including centerpieces for weddings.

Various Container Options

Along with your choice of plants and ornaments, here is where you can express your creativity. Dish garden containers, which are often shallow, may be replaced with baskets, earthenware, and terra cotta. Glass, metal, and resin (or plastic) are also often used.


You may find strange containers in your attic, at garage sales, and flea markets. I used my father's old dump truck from his youth to create this amusing dish garden, which you can see here.

Certain containers may or may not have drain holes. Dish gardens need drainage, so be careful to use the stones and charcoal in the manner suggested below.

On a table is a dish garden created from an old dump truck and filled with cacti, air plants, pumice stone, and glass chips.
The ancient dump truck that belonged to my father was converted into a gorgeous dish garden container. The cactus were inserted into the pumice stone planter.


Plant Choices

I like using plants with a variety of heights, textures, forms, and colors. Having said that, I like a dish garden made up just of low plants, such as a cactus or mushy succulent. Everything that is eye-catching is necessary.

A word of caution: make sure the plants you're combining have comparable exposure and watering requirements. I wouldn't, for instance, combine pothos and peace lilies with cactus (high light, low water) (lower light, more water).

Give the plants room to expand. In addition to being introduced for color, the yellow kalanchoe also filled in the space in front of the peperomias as they matured.

You may mix and combine everything you want while building a temporary garden!

2", 3", and 4" plants are used for dish gardens that are smaller. In larger pots, we often combine 6" and 4" nails.

 

VEGETATION IN FULL BLOOM

Excellent options that are quite easy to get are bromeliads, kalanchoes, cyclamen, tiny roses, African violets, begonias, Easter cacti, mums, Christmas cacti, and poinsettias.

PLANTS ARE COMING

Hoya, grape ivy, English ivy, creeping fig, pothos, heartleaf philodendron, arrowhead philodendron, and heartleaf philodendron, all belong to the genus Philodendron.

PLANT SPECIFICATIONS

succulents, button ferns, bird's nest ferns, aglaonemas, dieffenbachias, neanthebella palms, spathiphyllums, peperomias, snake plants, jade plants, Snake plant, jade plant, button fern, bird's nest fern, spathiphyllum, peperomia, dieffenbachia, neanthebella palm, aglaonema, and

 

How do you maintain your gorgeous dish garden in tip-top shape?

To reduce stress, make sure your dish garden plants are well-hydrated a few days before you want to set them. Soon after planting the plants, you should give them another watering.

Watering

I like to irrigate each plant's root ball separately rather than the whole garden. It appears to be prevented from becoming too wet by this. Use a watering can with a long, thin neck for this task. You can see which one I choose to utilize in the video.

I'm watering this peperomia dish garden every two weeks since Tucson is still quite hot. Throughout the winter, I'll decrease to every three to four weeks.

The quantity of light needed may vary depending on the kind of plants you're using. In Tucson, my peperomia garden thrives in my dining room with medium light while my cactus dish garden blooms in full sun outside. It is about ten feet from a bay window and has plenty of natural light all day.

Fertilizing

Make cautious not to fertilize your dish garden excessively. Since they are in shallow pots, minerals and salts might build up. If you used top-notch potting soil, they only need very little, if any, fertilizing. If yours does, once in the spring ought to be plenty.

If you have it, liquid kelp, fish emulsion, and a balanced liquid houseplant fertilizer would all be beneficial (5-5-5 or lower). Apply any of them diluted to half strength in the spring.

Since houseplants are intended to be resting throughout the late fall and winter, you shouldn't fertilize them during those times. Don't fertilize your houseplant if it is stressed, such as bone dry or soaking wet.

Every spring, I lightly cover all of my indoor plants with compost, then lightly cover my dish gardens with worm compost. It's easy; a quarter-inch layer of each is sufficient. You can read more about my worm compost and feeding the compost here.

Extra Attention Is Needed

Dish gardens often need little upkeep. Every now and again, you may need to remove a leaf that isn't needed or replace a plant that has become too big or unproductive. Watch out for pests (and make sure your plants are pest-free before planting them) since certain plantings for dish gardens are vulnerable to spider mites.